a) A person's abilities and life span Next

i) Introduction

It is useful to consider acquired brain injury within the context of a healthy person's abilities and life span.

A health persons's abilities include: understanding and communication, mobility, self-care, interacting with other people, being able to participate in life activities such as leisure, work and school, joining and participating in community activities.

A person's life span typically moves through the stages of birth, pre school years, school years, young adult, middle age, retirement and old age.

An acquired brain injury impacts on a person's abilities at a point in their life span. The nature and extent of the impact and the services and rehabilitation process that will be needed are related to the nature of the injury to the brain and the point in their life span when it occurs.

Planning services for people with acquired brain injury principles should be based on:

  • person centred principles
  • life span approach

 

 

ii) A person's abilities

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Click on the "Person" to display the person's abilities.
Click again to return to the opening screen.

These are people's abilities. An ABI will impact on these abilities.

 

 

iii) A person's life span

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Click on "Birth" to click though the screens.

Click on the "Individuals" to show ABI at different times in the life span.

The implications for the person and their life are very different depending on when the ABI occurs.

 

iv) Person centred planning

People with ABI, their family and carers should be at the centre of decision-making about how the service system supports them.

Person centred principles include:

  • people with an ABI, their families and carers are the primary determiners
  • people with an ABI are supported in their planning and decision-making
  • people with an ABI are offered choice, portability and flexibility in funding and supports
  • the allocation of resources to a person is based on assessed needs.

These principles underpin the implementation of Stronger Together 2: 2011 - 2016.

v) Life span approach

Working with people with ABI requires a life span approach.

A life span approach is about creating clear long term pathways for people. It involves having the right interventions at each point in a person's life to build their strengths and enable them to participate in and contribute to their communities.

The lifespan approach focuses on a number of significant life stages and transition points. For example:

  • working with a secondary student with an ABI would focus on working more intensively with the education system to maximise development of vocational and life skills.
  • working with a young person with an ABI who has left school might have a key objective to ensure their life and vocational skills are optimally developed for as independent a life as possible.
  • working with adults with ABI ongoing community access services and flexible respite options may be important to support people to continue participating and living in their communities.